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Heartland Monitor XVIII: Childhood in America

September 2013

Americans believe that there are serious challenges facing American children today that are clouding potential opportunities. They believe that opportunities for a quality education, access to health care, fair treatment, adequate play time, and sufficient love and attention are accessible to some, but are not guaranteed for the average American child. Further, there are stark differences in views regarding the role government and society should play in helping to pay the costs associated with raising children. Predictable partisan differences emerge when Americans are asked about policy approaches to address the cost of raising children.

View the Heartland XVII datakey findings and our press release on the survey.
Related Multimedia: Heartland XVIII: Childhood in America


Heartland Monitor Poll XVII: New Poll Shows Americans Anxious About Privacy

June 2013

Big Brother is watching and Americans know it. New figures from the quarterly Allstate/National Journal Heartland Monitor Poll show that most Americans exhibit a healthy amount of skepticism and resignation about data collection and surveillance, and show varying degrees of trust in institutions to responsibly use their personal information. Recent headlines focusing on government collection of telephone records within the United States may further stoke the underlying worries that the American public has about data privacy.

View the Heartland XVII datakey findings and our press release on the survey.
Related Multimedia: Allstate Heartland Monitor XVII


Heartland Monitor XVI: Middle Class More Anxious than Aspirational

April 2013

The 16th quarterly Allstate-National Journal Heartland Monitor Poll focuses on the American middle class and seeks to uncover important insights about how this cornerstone economic group perceives the future. The poll asks Americans to define what it means to be part of the middle class, based on income, financial security, education and lifestyle. Unsurprisingly, many Americans (46 percent) identify as middle class and almost all Americans (85 percent) consider themselves a part of an expanded definition of being middle class that includes upper middle class (12 percent), and lower middle class (26 percent).

View the Heartland XVI data, key findings and our press release on the survey.
Related Multimedia: Allstate Heartland Monitor XVI


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